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So-Called Dollar. 1875 Five-Piece Set Centennial Celebration of the Battle of Lexington-Concord Meda

Currency:USD Category:Coins & Paper Money Start Price:10,000.00 USD Estimated At:0.00 - 0.00 USD
So-Called Dollar. 1875 Five-Piece Set Centennial Celebration of the Battle of Lexington-Concord Meda
SOLD
57,500.00USD+ (11,500.00) buyer's premium + applicable fees & taxes.
This item SOLD at 2020 Feb 28 @ 20:08UTC-5 : EST/CDT
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So-Called Dollar. 1875 Five-Piece Set Centennial Celebration of the Battle of Lexington-Concord Medal.

All are 38 mm. Dies as illustrated. Includes: HK-1004, Julian-CM-24. Gold. 577.3 grains. Plain Edge. A rarity in the absolute sense, one of just four examples struck at the Philadelphia Mint for sale or presentation at the event. Choice to Gem Proof, essentially as struck and preserved exceptionally well for the past 145 years. Deep yellow-gold with a visually warming orange-gold glow. Beautiful and rare. These sold for $30 each at the event; evidently demand was not high * HK-16, Julian-CM-24. Silver. Choice to Gem Proof, essentially as struck. 100 struck. Bright and lustrous silver with beautiful orange-gold halos at the rims. These sold for $3.00 each at the event * Bronze. HK-17, Julian-CM-24. Choice to Gem Proof, essentially as struck. 200 struck. Nearly chocolate-brown on the obverse, lighter chestnut brown on the reverse. These sold for $1 at the Centennial event * White Metal. Unpierced. HK-18. Struck Outside the Mint. Choice to Gem Proof, essentially as struck. Fully brilliant and boldly lustrous in the mirror fields. The issue price at the event was $1.50 * White Metal. HK-18. Struck Outside the Mint. Holed for Suspension. Proof, somewhat choice but a trifle scuffy in the reverse field; this may have been worn for a brief time around a neck. Brilliant and lustrous. The holed version offered here sold for just 50-cents at the Centennial affair. A complete set of all the metallic issues in the 1875 Centennial of Lexington-Concord presents a challenge to medal and so-called dollar collectors owing to the rarity of the gold issue. Indeed, no more than four complete sets can be achieved at any one time in collecting circles, and we understand at least one of the other three known pieces is notably impaired. Definitely a lot that will bring out the advanced specialists. “What a Glorious Morning for America.” (Total: 5 pieces)

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