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Pattern 1838 Half Dollar Judd-72, Original 1838 Pattern Half Dollar. Judd-72, Pollock-75. Silver. Re

Currency:USD Category:Coins & Paper Money Start Price:10.00 USD Estimated At:0.00 - 0.00 USD
Pattern 1838 Half Dollar Judd-72, Original 1838 Pattern Half Dollar. Judd-72, Pollock-75. Silver. Re
SOLD
3,500.00USDto L*S+ (700.00) buyer's premium + applicable fees & taxes.
This item SOLD at 2018 Mar 08 @ 21:45UTC-6 : CST/MDT
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Pattern 1838 Half Dollar
Judd-72, Original 1838 Pattern Half Dollar. Judd-72, Pollock-75. Silver. Reeded Edge. Medal Turn. Rarity-5. Proof-62 NGC. CAC. Obv: fancy bust of Liberty to left, tiara at forehead with sun design, ribbon in long tresses marked LIBERTY, seven stars before, six stars behind bust, date below. Rev: perched eagle, wings spread, arrows in sinister claw, olive branch in dexter claw, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA HALF DOLLAR around, pellets before and after denomination. Produced during the Kneass tenure at the Mint, but dies probably by Gobrecht. This attractive pattern half dollar is a study in silver and gray toning, with the frosty central obverse device mainly brilliant, while the reflective surroundings are splashed with soft peach-gold and gray wisps of varying intensity; much the same will be seen on the flip-side. Accurately graded and eye-appealing at every turn. Housed in an old-style “fatty” NGC holder.
The uspatterns.com website tells the following tale about Judd-72 (and J-73): “These supposedly exist as both originals and restrikes. Originals should have been struck from unrusted dies, weigh 206 grains and have 143 reeds around the edge. Restrikes were made throughout the 1840s possibly into the early 1870s. As these dies were used over a long period of time, specimens show varying degrees of repolishing and / or die rust. Those made after 1853 should weigh 192 grains. Reed counts may vary on these and thus could possibly be used to determine what year a given piece was struck. The fact that the Mint collection does not contain an example may also be significant, as this pattern would have been produced at the initial formation of the collection and likely would have been included if it was actually struck in 1838.”